Audiophile Life

Records. Concert Photography. Food. NYC. Nigeria. Africa. African Diaspora.

#Vinyl

yagazieemezi:

‘I started the shop in 1979,’ Vall explains. ‘Thirty five years ago.’ A short man with cropped grey hair, he seems much younger. Vall was born in Nema, far in the east of the country. ‘At that time, it took six days to travel to the capital,’ he says. Like so many others fleeing the drought and hardships of the countryside, Vall settled in Nouakchott. With a steady supply of music from Mali and Senegal, he built the Saphire D’Or.

‘I picked the name after the most beautiful thing, which is gold, naturally.’ Deejaying at soirées throughout the capital, Vall lists a number of the hotels and nightclubs where the Mauritanian youth partied late into the night: the Chinguetti, the Palmeri, the Maision de Jeune. Most of them no longer exist, torn down, paved over, and replaced.

Over the years, as vinyl faded into obscurity and Nouakchott’s old residents cast out their record collections, Vall was here to absorb them. ‘All the vinyl records that were in Mauritania, I pretty much have them here,’ he laughs. He began to sell dubbed cassettes. Customers could come in, browse the records and make their choice.

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Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

atane:

The Musings of Miles in 1955 was an album that finally began showcasing the future path Miles would take with his groups. The album included Red Garland and Philly Joe Jones, two-thirds of his rhythm section that rounded out the group that went on to be known as the first Great Quintet.
*It should be noted that Miles recorded an album called “Blues Moods” with Charles Mingus and Elvin Jones a month after The Musings of Miles. It was on Mingus’ short lived record label, Debut Records. It was a fairly low key release.*

This record started a very fruitful relationship between Philly Joe and Miles.

atane:

The Musings of Miles in 1955 was an album that finally began showcasing the future path Miles would take with his groups. The album included Red Garland and Philly Joe Jones, two-thirds of his rhythm section that rounded out the group that went on to be known as the first Great Quintet.

*It should be noted that Miles recorded an album called “Blues Moods” with Charles Mingus and Elvin Jones a month after The Musings of Miles. It was on Mingus’ short lived record label, Debut Records. It was a fairly low key release.*

This record started a very fruitful relationship between Philly Joe and Miles.

atane:

Lee Morgan - Candy

Lee recorded this masterpiece when he was only 19 years old.

Happy birthday Lee Morgan.

Today is Hank Mobley’s birthday.
A Caddy for Daddy is one of his overlooked records. The lineup with Mobley is Lee Morgan, Curtis Fuller, McCoy Tyner, Billy Higgins and Bob Cranshaw.

Today is Hank Mobley’s birthday.

A Caddy for Daddy is one of his overlooked records. The lineup with Mobley is Lee Morgan, Curtis Fuller, McCoy Tyner, Billy Higgins and Bob Cranshaw.

atane:

"John Coltrane is a quiet, powerfully-built young man who plays tenor saxophone quite unlike anyone in all of jazz. His style has been described as "sheets of sound" or as "flurries of melody." But, despite the accuracy, or lack of accuracy of such descriptions, it is a fact that Coltrane’s style is wholly original and of growing influence among new tenor players." - The first paragraph of the liner notes in Africa/Brass, penned by Dom Cerulli.
The Africa/Brass session was Coltrane’s first album on Impulse! records. Coltrane was backed by a fifteen-piece brass band, plus his own working band. In total, there were 21 musicians for the Africa/Brass sessions. This was the largest ensemble Coltrane had ever gathered as a leader.
This is the full list of musicians
John Coltrane — soprano and tenor saxophone
Eric Dolphy — alto saxophone, bass clarinet, flute (Also the arranger)
Booker Little — trumpet    
Freddie Hubbard — trumpet
Britt Woodman — trombone    
Charles Greenlee — euphonium    
Julian Priester — euphonium  
Carl Bowman — euphonium 
Bill Barber — tuba    
Garvin Bushell — piccolo, woodwinds 
Donald Corrado — french horn    
Bob Northern — french horn    
Robert Swisshelm — french horn    
Julius Watkins — french horn    
Jim Buffington — french horn     
Pat Patrick — baritone saxophone    
McCoy Tyner — piano    
Reggie Workman — bass    
Paul Chambers — bass
Art Davis — bass
Elvin Jones — drums

He doesn’t get enough credit for it, but Eric Dolphy was the arranger on this record.

atane:

"John Coltrane is a quiet, powerfully-built young man who plays tenor saxophone quite unlike anyone in all of jazz. His style has been described as "sheets of sound" or as "flurries of melody." But, despite the accuracy, or lack of accuracy of such descriptions, it is a fact that Coltrane’s style is wholly original and of growing influence among new tenor players." - The first paragraph of the liner notes in Africa/Brass, penned by Dom Cerulli.

The Africa/Brass session was Coltrane’s first album on Impulse! records. Coltrane was backed by a fifteen-piece brass band, plus his own working band. In total, there were 21 musicians for the Africa/Brass sessions. This was the largest ensemble Coltrane had ever gathered as a leader.

This is the full list of musicians

John Coltrane — soprano and tenor saxophone

Eric Dolphy — alto saxophone, bass clarinet, flute (Also the arranger)

Booker Little — trumpet    

Freddie Hubbard — trumpet

Britt Woodman — trombone    

Charles Greenlee — euphonium    

Julian Priester — euphonium  

Carl Bowman — euphonium 

Bill Barber — tuba    

Garvin Bushell — piccolo, woodwinds 

Donald Corrado — french horn    

Bob Northern — french horn    

Robert Swisshelm — french horn    

Julius Watkins — french horn    

Jim Buffington — french horn     

Pat Patrick — baritone saxophone    

McCoy Tyner — piano    

Reggie Workman — bass    

Paul Chambers — bass

Art Davis — bass

Elvin Jones — drums

He doesn’t get enough credit for it, but Eric Dolphy was the arranger on this record.

atane:

Listening: Eric Dolphy - Berlin Concerts

Today is Eric Dolphy’s birthday.

Horace Silver died today at the age of 85.

These are but a few of my favorite records with him as a leader. It’s a very long list and I have all his 50s and 60s output both as a leader and as a sideman.

If you are one of those that knew me from the now defunct Blue Note forums many years ago, then you might remember me as “The Hard Bop Disciple”. Yes, that was me selling all those original Blue Note pressings, including the signed ones from Horace Silver. I got those signed records from my mentor who told me many stories of his escapades in the 60s, some of which included Horace Silver. Maybe I’ll get around to posting some tidbits at a future date.

R.I.P. Horace Silver

Pax Nicholas and The Nettey Family - Na Teef Know De Road of Teef
From 1971 to 1978, Pax Nicholas was part of Fela Kuti’s band, the Africa 70. He was a percussionist and background singer. The first record he appeared on was Shakara. Think about Fela hits like Zombie, Yellow Fever, Expensive Shit, He Miss Road, Everything Scatter and countless others in that time period. Pax was on every last one.
Pax was born Nicholas Addo-Nettey in Accra, Ghana. An accomplished singer, dancer and percussionist in his own right, he came to Lagos, Nigeria in his late teens and made an impression on Fela Kuti who welcomed him into the Africa 70 in 1971. He was part of that legendary group for 7 years.
The excerpt below is a quote from Matti Steinitz in Berlin about Pax.
“In the 70s he (Pax Nicholas) experienced life in Fela’s Kalakuta Republic, a place where about 100 musicians, dancers, friends and family members of Fela lived, played, loved, and celebrated together. It was a property in Lagos that had been declared an independent state by Fela, in open defiance of the brutal dictatorship that was ruling in Nigeria at that time. The regime, which hated Fela for his radical messages and his popularity, attacked Kalakuta several times. In one of these raids, Nicholas was arrested with several other band members and remained in prison for nine months, where he was strongly mistreated. During another army attack in 1977, Fela’s mother was thrown out of an upstairs window and killed, and the whole compound was burned to the ground. The dangerous conditions became too much for Nicholas to bear. When playing at the Berlin Jazz Festival in 1978, he and other band members, including drummer Tony Allen, left Africa 70 because they didn’t want to go back to Nigeria. While Allen moved to Paris, Nicholas stayed in Berlin where he raised two sons and continues to play music to this day. Pax Nicholas now leads his own band, Ridimtaksi, which features West African musicians, continuing to play his own fresh take on Afrobeat.”
Pax released two solo albums with the Martins Brothers Band from Port Harcourt, Rivers State. He released ‘Mind Your Own Business’ in 1971, and later ‘Na Teef Know De Road of Teef’ in 1973 which was recorded in Ginger Baker’s state of the art recording studio in Lagos with members of Fela’s Africa 70. Fela did not approve of this and told him not to ever play the record again. The record lay dormant for over 30 years until it was reissued a few years ago.

Pax Nicholas and The Nettey Family - Na Teef Know De Road of Teef

From 1971 to 1978, Pax Nicholas was part of Fela Kuti’s band, the Africa 70. He was a percussionist and background singer. The first record he appeared on was Shakara. Think about Fela hits like Zombie, Yellow Fever, Expensive Shit, He Miss Road, Everything Scatter and countless others in that time period. Pax was on every last one.

Pax was born Nicholas Addo-Nettey in Accra, Ghana. An accomplished singer, dancer and percussionist in his own right, he came to Lagos, Nigeria in his late teens and made an impression on Fela Kuti who welcomed him into the Africa 70 in 1971. He was part of that legendary group for 7 years.

The excerpt below is a quote from Matti Steinitz in Berlin about Pax.

“In the 70s he (Pax Nicholas) experienced life in Fela’s Kalakuta Republic, a place where about 100 musicians, dancers, friends and family members of Fela lived, played, loved, and celebrated together. It was a property in Lagos that had been declared an independent state by Fela, in open defiance of the brutal dictatorship that was ruling in Nigeria at that time. The regime, which hated Fela for his radical messages and his popularity, attacked Kalakuta several times. In one of these raids, Nicholas was arrested with several other band members and remained in prison for nine months, where he was strongly mistreated. During another army attack in 1977, Fela’s mother was thrown out of an upstairs window and killed, and the whole compound was burned to the ground. The dangerous conditions became too much for Nicholas to bear. When playing at the Berlin Jazz Festival in 1978, he and other band members, including drummer Tony Allen, left Africa 70 because they didn’t want to go back to Nigeria. While Allen moved to Paris, Nicholas stayed in Berlin where he raised two sons and continues to play music to this day. Pax Nicholas now leads his own band, Ridimtaksi, which features West African musicians, continuing to play his own fresh take on Afrobeat.”

Pax released two solo albums with the Martins Brothers Band from Port Harcourt, Rivers State. He released ‘Mind Your Own Business’ in 1971, and later ‘Na Teef Know De Road of Teef’ in 1973 which was recorded in Ginger Baker’s state of the art recording studio in Lagos with members of Fela’s Africa 70. Fela did not approve of this and told him not to ever play the record again. The record lay dormant for over 30 years until it was reissued a few years ago.

brklynbreed:

viiximcmxc:

chrihyonce:

Rihanna being Rihanna.

Baby

See effortlessly sexy. How could you not want allat?

Rihanna is dancing and looking sexy, but the first thing I noticed was the Marantz TT-15S1 turntable. It’s next to her left hand towards the end of the video if you don’t see it.

This is what happens when you’re an audiophile. A beautiful person can enter a room in a see-through outfit and shake their bum, but you’ll end up looking at a turntable.

Don’t become an audiophile kids. You will prioritize the wrong things. I clearly need help…lol