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yaro-e:

Another picture from Kankai village, Katsina state. This is the entrance of the palace door. It was created in 1898, it’s quite a beautiful doorway. 

yaro-e:

Another picture from Kankai village, Katsina state. This is the entrance of the palace door. It was created in 1898, it’s quite a beautiful doorway. 

dynamicafrica:

Born on this day, October 15, 1938, in Abeokuta, Nigeria - Fela Anikulapo Kuti.

"I must identify myself with Africa. Then I will have an identity." 
On how he came up with his Afrobeat sound.

"Name? Fela. 
Just Fela? Yeah, jus’ Fela. 
Address? My house. 
Where? Right here, in Surulere, man, yeah!” 
A conversation between Fela and the police officer who ‘checked’ him in at Alagbon Close police station in 1974, the very first time Fela was arrested. 

"To be spiritual is not by praying and going to church. Spiritualism is the understanding of the universe so that it can be a better place to live in." 
Fela’s explanation on one of his anti-Christian views. 

"…man is here against his will. Where do we come from? What was before us?…when you think you die, you’re not dead. It’s a transition." 
Fela being philosophical on life and death. 

"That is my best friend because it is a gift of the creator to Africans. It is a spirit. Marijuana has five fingers of creation…it enhances all your five senses." 
Pointing to and explaining the essence of a joint. 

"No. Not at all. You know what I want? I want the world to change." 
Fela’s reply to the question : ”Do you want to leave an imprint on the world?” 

Fela Kuti (born Olufela Olusegun Oludotun Ransome-Kuti; 15 October 1938 – 2 August 1997).

(quotes source)

atane:

The theft of the Benin Bronzes.

The Benin Bronzes are a collection of more than 3000 artifacts from the Kingdom of Benin, which is in present day Nigeria.

Many of the Benin Bronze artifacts are currently housed in the British Museum, as well as other museums across Western Europe, and the United States.

Some of the priceless pieces are procured by wealthy art collectors through auctions, like this Bronze Memorial Head sold by Christie’s Auction House in London for 1.2 million pounds in 1989. The British Museum itself sold numerous pieces, as late as 1972. (Source)

Privately (black market), collectors acquire all kinds of Benin art not just limited to bronze/brass. Rare artifacts made from ivory, clay, wood, terracotta, and other materials all command high prices. Many of these are in the hands of German estates. German collectors bought them first when a sizable amount was sold in the late 1890s.

It needs to be stressed that these weren’t an archaeological find. These are looted artifacts. Under the command of Admiral Sir Harry Rawson, the artifacts were stolen by the British Army in the Benin Expedition of 1897. They deliberately destroyed, plundered, and burned Benin down to the ground. To date, no one knows how many Edo people were killed in Benin by the British. The expedition brought an end to the Kingdom of Benin. Click here for a short video on how the looting occurred. 

Only a handful of these artifacts are in Nigeria today. Nigeria had to buy back 50 pieces of their own artifacts from the British Museum. The British Museum refuses to return the rest, despite being fully aware that they were stolen.

Click here for a listing of pictures and details on some of the various Benin artifacts housed mostly in museums in Europe and the US.

More videos: Vid 1 - Vid 2

The Nollywood Diaspora Film Series is pleased to present it’s second annual forum, themed Cultural Confidence: Acquiring and Negotiating Authentic Cultural Identity in a Globalized World. In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the creation of Nigeria and 54 years of Nigerian independence, NDFS will screen world-class films of New Nollywood and host panel discussions on pertinent issues facing Nigerians at home and abroad.

WEB: nollywood.filmseries.co
FACEBOOK: facebook.com/events/724260264310397/731001200302970
Tickets: eventbrite.com/e/nollywood-diaspora-film-series-cultural-confidence-tickets-13129341213
#CULTURALCONFIDENCE

Promo featuring:
Adepero Oduye (‘Twelve Years a Slave’, ‘Steel Magnolias’, ‘Pariah’ and others)
Gbenga Akinagbe (‘24’, ‘The Wire’, ‘The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3’ and others)
Andrew Dosunmu (Director of ‘Mother of George’, ‘Restless City’)

Film footage courtesy of Golden Effects Studios & Real Livin Films
Music and Production by SIJI

nok-ind:

Martiniano Eliseu do Bomfim Yoruba name was Òjélàdé, (1859-1943), was born in Bahia, Brazil. His father was a member of the Egba, one of the Yoruba sub-groups, had been brought to Brazil as a slave in 1820 and liberated there in 1842. A 16-year-old Martiniano accompanied his father, Eliseu do Bomfim, who was an import/export trader of Yoruba goods, on a trip from Salvador, Bahia to Lagos, Yorubaland in 1875 for the purpose of attending school and learning a trade. In Lagos he attended the Church Missionary Society Alápákó Fàájì School for almost 11 years. He arrived back in Salvador on January 30, 1886. During his time in Lagos Martiniano became fluent not only in English but also in Yoruba. He also acquired knowledge of Ifá, the Yoruba system of divination and became a Babalawo, as well as being trained as a bricklayer and house painter. Back in Bahia he worked as an English teacher for well to do Afro-Brazilians. Martiniano died on November 1, 1943 in Salvador, Bahia. Photo: 1937

nok-ind:

Martiniano Eliseu do Bomfim Yoruba name was Òjélàdé, (1859-1943), was born in Bahia, Brazil. His father was a member of the Egba, one of the Yoruba sub-groups, had been brought to Brazil as a slave in 1820 and liberated there in 1842. A 16-year-old Martiniano accompanied his father, Eliseu do Bomfim, who was an import/export trader of Yoruba goods, on a trip from Salvador, Bahia to Lagos, Yorubaland in 1875 for the purpose of attending school and learning a trade. In Lagos he attended the Church Missionary Society Alápákó Fàájì School for almost 11 years. He arrived back in Salvador on January 30, 1886. During his time in Lagos Martiniano became fluent not only in English but also in Yoruba. He also acquired knowledge of Ifá, the Yoruba system of divination and became a Babalawo, as well as being trained as a bricklayer and house painter. Back in Bahia he worked as an English teacher for well to do Afro-Brazilians. Martiniano died on November 1, 1943 in Salvador, Bahia. Photo: 1937

I should be doing work, instead I’m watching Nollywood movies back to back.

I should be doing work, instead I’m watching Nollywood movies back to back.

This song was such a classic. Childhood memories right here.

Nollywood movies are really crass and vulgar these days…haha

yagazieemezi:

I’m glad that Dupe emailed me her video for a watch because it is so relevant.
I’m pretty sure that not just Nigerians can relate to this and take a couple of her points with them.
Plus, she’s an absolute dear to watch.
What are your thoughts?

This video is timely. I tend to get saddled with negativity relating to certain issues in Nigeria, but as she said, life is happening. It’s important to put that in perspective. Thanks for sharing.