Audiophile Life

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#Nigeria

ukpuru:

The Igbo earth goddess, Ala in an Mbari house dedicated to her in Ebele, near Owere. William Fagg, 28th February 1946.

ukpuru:

The Igbo earth goddess, Ala in an Mbari house dedicated to her in Ebele, near Owere. William Fagg, 28th February 1946.

ukpuru:

Portrait of an Igbo student in domesticity class, 1967, Drs. G.W. (Gerrit Willem) Grootenhuis.

ukpuru:

Portrait of an Igbo student in domesticity class, 1967, Drs. G.W. (Gerrit Willem) Grootenhuis.

Nigerian newspaper headlines are so absurd.

Nigerian newspaper headlines are so absurd.

Talking children, women and Africa with Chimamanda Adichie

mosaicrecords:

Underrated Gem
Olatunji: Drums of Passion
1959 was a watershed year for influential albums at the Columbia label. In addition to landmark recordings by Miles Davis (Kind Of Blue), Dave Brubeck (Take Five) and Charles Mingus (Mingus Ah Um), Michael Babatunde Olatunji gave America its first real taste of African music with Drums Of Passion, which featured both African and American black artists in an authentic and influential album.
-Michael Cuscuna Read Blog…  Follow: Mosaic Records Facebook Tumblr Twitter


Ted Gioia titles his post on this record “A Forgotten Masterpiece”. What? Forgotten by who? Maybe white people have forgotten it, but we have not. The record is a lot of things, but forgotten isn’t one of it. We know it well. 
Friendly reminder, when you hear this song by Santana, thank Olatunji for it. It’s his song. The original.

mosaicrecords:

Underrated Gem


Olatunji: Drums of Passion

1959 was a watershed year for influential albums at the Columbia label. In addition to landmark recordings by Miles Davis (Kind Of Blue), Dave Brubeck (Take Five) and Charles Mingus (Mingus Ah Um), Michael Babatunde Olatunji gave America its first real taste of African music with Drums Of Passion, which featured both African and American black artists in an authentic and influential album.

-Michael Cuscuna
Read Blog…

Follow: Mosaic Records Facebook Tumblr Twitter

Ted Gioia titles his post on this record “A Forgotten Masterpiece”. What? Forgotten by who? Maybe white people have forgotten it, but we have not. The record is a lot of things, but forgotten isn’t one of it. We know it well

Friendly reminder, when you hear this song by Santana, thank Olatunji for it. It’s his song. The original.

nigerianostalgia:

Igbo mask dancers performing during the Onwa Asaa festival, Ugwuoba village, Nigeria.

Masquerade dancers in Ibo village of Ugwuoba, between Awka and Enugu. Masked and costumed men are chosen by their villages to wear costumes and to masquerade during the annual yam festival, called ‘Onwasato’ in Ibo.

The appearance of the moon governs the communal activities such as the commencement of farm work, festivities and ritual offerings. For example, the seventh moon (Onwa asaa) appears in August and marks the month of the thanksgiving service to the ancestors. The community in turn obtains permission to eat new yams without fear of reprisals from their ancestors.

The eighth month is Onwa asato, which appears during the month of September or October. Onwa asaa refers to the month when the ritual feast of new yam is celebrated. The seventh month thus becomes the official title by which the activity is known.

During this festival, the appearance of masks and the masquerading features merely mark the celebration of the feast.” [Anigbo O., 1987: Commensality and Human Relationship Among the Igbo. University of Nigeria Press]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Life magazine and traveled to Africa from August 18, 1959 to December 20, 1959.
Vintage Nigeria

atane:

Poison Fire - A short film about the Niger Delta region in Nigeria.

Synopsis

The Niger Delta is an environmental disaster zone after fifty years of oil exploitation.   One and a half million tons of crude oil has been spilled into the creeks, farms and forests, the equivalent to 50 Exxon Valdez disasters, one per year. Natural gas contained in the crude oil is not being collected, but burnt off in gas flares, burning day and night for decades. The flaring produces as much greenhouse gases as 18 million cars and emits toxic and carcinogenic substances in the midst of densely populated areas. Corruption is rampant, the security situation is dire, people are dying.  But the oil keeps flowing.

Poison Firefollows a team of local activists as they gather “video testimonies” from communities on the impact of oils spills and gas flaring. We see creeks full of crude oil, devastated mangrove forests, wellheads that has been leaking gas and oil for months. We meet  people whose survival is acutely threatened by the loss of farmland, fishing and drinking water and the health hazards of gas flaring. 

We also meet meet with Jonah Gbemre, who took Shell to court over the gas flaring in his village and won a surprise victory in the court.

Ifie Lott travels to the Netherlands to attend Shell’s Annual General Meeting. She wants to ask a simple question:  Is Shell going to obey the court order and stop flaring?  There is a demonstration outside  the meeting hall. Shell’s CEO shows up for the photo op and shakes her hand, and she meets the MD of Shell-Nigeria, Basil Omiyi.  She asks him about the spills and the flaring. He patiently explains Shell’s policies and efforts for social development, but what he says is at odds with reality on the ground.

Back in the Delta, Ifie returns to the communties and shows the taped interview with Omiyo to the victims of the oil industry…

Shell ignored the federal high court ruling. The oil companies continue the illegal gas flaring. Shell has set its own “flares out” deadline to end of 2009. But they have kept saying “next year” for a decade, and in the Delta nobody believes them.

Meanwhile, the oil keeps flowing.

Poison Fire

I’m reblogging this because of a twitter chat dynamicafrica had about incidents where lack of access to clean water and/or sanitation has caused a health crisis for communities. I immediately thought of the Niger Delta.

willyverse:

It’s been 8 years since I spent a summer in Nigeria, so I was a bit hesitant to make the trip. I had a couple projects I wanted to execute. ‘Something to do’ was not on that list

Every time people living overseas visit Nigeria, there’s a tendency to take pictures of people on the streets of Lagos. Pictures of hawkers, wheel barrow pushers and buses are some of the common ones you’d see.This time around, I just felt doing that would be typical and pointless. One fateful afternoon, stuck in traffic, I noticed a street hawker selling Calculators. I thought to myself, “on a hot day like today, why on earth would you be out selling calculators”. Then It dawned on me. He’d rather walk around in the hot sun cause there’s a possibility he might sell one calculator, than sit at home doing nothing. Though you could say he should choose some other, more profitable, product, at the end of the day, it’s Just Something to do. Ah! 

From there, it was all about challenging myself to take portraits of  locals in the area, craftsmen, sellers etc. I aimed to showcase a wide array of jobs people take on, regardless of how non-profitable it might seem. I always assumed that this would be easy, cause Nigerians are generally happy people. I was spectacularly wrong. Nigeria is in a state of paranoia at the moment. You point a camera at anyone without permission, and you just might get attacked. I didn’t get attacked, but I was reported by a mallam whom I thought was just ‘unlooking’. Some portraits were easier than others because my parents are frequent customers of these traders. Some took a lot of convincing, like the tailor.

All in all it was an experience I was/am thankful for. Getting out of my comfort zone, and convincing strangers to have their picture taken is not something I thought I was capable of.

'Something to do' speaks to the character of the citizens. With an almost non existent middle class, it could be so easy to look to crime as a resolve. But these people, and others out there choose to use their hands to make an honest living, no matter how little the income might be.

saharareporters:

Ezekwesili: Enough Is Enough; 150 Days Too Long To Rescue Chibok Girls

“One hundred and fifty days is too long for young girls to be in the midst of killers. They want us to move on. We can’t move on; they are our daughters. Enough is enough; it is time to rescue those girls and send a signal to the world that we are not a godforsaken country. Nigeria is a great country and we can rescue our girls.

Read More…