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#Nigeria

A Nollywood director somewhere in Nigeria is probably brainstorming or thinking about an “Ebola Babes” movie. You just know this is happening right now.

Tagline: Ebola Babes - Their love is deadly. *cue ominous music*

Female bomber kills 6 in Nigeria, 10-year-old with explosives held »

Nigerian zionists

Here’s a topic not really discussed. Many Nigerian christians are pro-Israel. Over discussions to try to get to the bottom of their position and how they arrived there, the one recurring reason for their position is their faith. I’ll elaborate.

Over the last few weeks, I noticed an uptick in cryptic facebook posts from some Nigerian christians about how what is happening in Gaza is god’s plan. Upon further investigation and directly from their own mouths, they support Israel because they believe the “chosen people” have returned to their homeland. In accordance to their beliefs, the state of Israel sets the wheels in motion for the second coming of jesus. They believe it is a biblical prophecy and that during the second coming, jews who don’t accept jesus as their lord and savior will not be spared come judgment day. This is the beginning of a chain of events that will culminate in judgment day. Their position isn’t one that favors jews in the end either. You have to believe what they believe or risk spending an eternity in hell. That’s all there is to it.

I hope I don’t need to explain why this ideology is troubling. It bothers me that seemingly intelligent and reasonable people think this makes sense. When you see Nigerian christians vehemently supporting Israel, there is a probability that this ideology is the real reason why. It has nothing to do with the statehood of Israel or anything of the sort, even though it might appear that way on the surface. They are getting ready for the end of the world based on their interpretation of the bible. It’s fundamentalist biblical dogma (though I bet they wouldn’t see themselves as fundies). You should understand this in case you encounter one of them. Once you understand this, then you’ll know it’s best not to engage with them on this topic. Never argue about religion.

You’ll notice I didn’t mention Palestinians once. When talking to Nigerian zionists, they never brought up Palestinians. Everything was about Israel, the “chosen people”, the second coming and judgment day. When I brought up Palestinians and where they fit in all this, I was largely met with “if they accept jesus as their lord and savior before it’s too late then they will enter the kingdom of heaven” type of talk. That was their answer to everything. Just accept jesus like they have. I mentioned that some Palestinians are christians. Like machines, they reverted back to how the good Palestinian christians will be abundantly blessed in the afterlife if they truly accepted jesus as their lord and savior. You cannot have a conversation grounded in reality with them sad to say.

I could go on a long spiel about the lunacy of being a Nigerian zionist, but what is the point? I’ll say this instead; some people get so deep in their religious dogma that they end up losing their humanity. If you truly believed in a higher power, then is this what god would want? Why do these people think they have a direct line to god’s plans? Did god tell them all this? God is supposed to be the omnipotent one, not them. Yet these people act like they are privy to everything supernatural.

Disclaimer: Obviously not all Nigerian christians think like this. Yes, I have to say “not all”, because people will contact me to say “not all”.

Rivers Police arrest man, 10-yr-old boy for witchcraft - Vanguard News »

Yeah, I laughed - but this is a serious matter. In Rivers State as a kid, people would warn you not to pick up coins on the street because they believed it would turn you into a goat and you would be whisked away for nefarious reasons (juju, witchcraft, rituals etc). Many kids from my generation shrieked away from kobo on the street because they didn’t want to become goats. I know that sounds ridiculous, but hey, people believed it (I didn’t). Shit, kids didn’t want to end up in a boiling pot of peppersoup. Who does?

Also, we were warned to stay away from Ikwerre people whenever one of their chiefs died. They told kids to stay home. It was believed that the Ikwerre people would kidnap kids and random people to behead whenever one of their chiefs died. They allegedly buried heads with their dead chiefs.

Take all this with a grain of salt of course. I’ve often wondered how true the Ikwerre beheading thing is. It wouldn’t surprise me if it was just a form of xenophobia against them.

Also, a lot of people in Rivers State are very superstitious in general. There are always stories of people morphing into cats, dogs, goats etc. The nightwatchman at my family compound swears he saw a man morph into a giant snake. He’s also a raging alcoholic and smells of schnapps in the morning. Maybe it’s connected to his drinking problem. Maybe it’s not.

Patrick Obahiagbon’s latest facebook status. If you look past the unnecessary flowery speech, he’s actually making sense this time…lol

Patrick Obahiagbon’s latest facebook status. If you look past the unnecessary flowery speech, he’s actually making sense this time…lol

Looks like Nigerian christians on FB created a fake TD Jakes page. I guess the real one wasn’t nonsensical enough. Just type ‘amen’ for your new car key to be released by jesus. Daddy wants a Benz…lol

Looks like Nigerian christians on FB created a fake TD Jakes page. I guess the real one wasn’t nonsensical enough. Just type ‘amen’ for your new car key to be released by jesus. Daddy wants a Benz…lol

Nigeria fears as man falls ill with Ebola-like symptoms »

A Liberian man has been hospitalised in Lagos with Ebola-like symptoms, but it is not yet clear if he is infected with the killer virus, Nigerian officials said Thursday.

The 40-year-old Monrovia resident arrived in Nigeria’s mega-city on Sunday and was admitted to hospital on Tuesday suffering from severe vomiting and diarrhoea, said Yewande Adesina, the special advisor on health for the Lagos state government.

The patient was “detained for possible Ebola infection while blood samples were sent to the Virology Reference Laboratory in Lagos as well as to the World Health Organisation (WHO) in Dakar,” he said.

"Results are still pending. Presently the patient’s condition is stable and he is in recovery," Adesina told journalists. "The diarrhoea and vomited have stopped. He is still under isolation."

The patient travelled from Monrovia to Lagos via Togo’s capital Lome, Adesina said.

The WHO has recorded more than 900 cases of Ebola in the epidemic that has raged across West Africa in recent months, but this is the first suspected case to emerge in Nigeria since the outbreak began.

Liberia has recorded 172 cases of the disease, including 105 deaths.

The man died today according to Reuters

This is good news. On the surface at least. Hopefully they will be able to flush out Boko Haram and those that finance, aid and abet them. In a perfect world, they will tackle this earnestly, which will mean political upheaval in some respects. Many politicians and top tier military brass will be exposed if the goal is to truly combat and neutralize Boko Haram. It will be messy (and bloody).
The question is, what took them so long to arrive here? It’s common sense. After the Chibok kidnappings, I said this was the only logical course of action. Quite a few people disagreed with me as they felt that western intervention was best. I disagreed with that opinion then and I disagree with it now. We’ve got to change the way we think in times of crisis, but that’s another story for another day.
This is a problem that can only be fixed by regional forces. It must be fixed from within. Western intervention beyond intelligence or supplying surveillance equipment means two things;
1. An eventual abandonment or exodus which does nothing long term.
2. Permanent or long term occupation which is never a good thing. This will ultimately lead to even more problems. 
Let’s wait and see. That’s all we can do. These developments are long overdue.

This is good news. On the surface at least. Hopefully they will be able to flush out Boko Haram and those that finance, aid and abet them. In a perfect world, they will tackle this earnestly, which will mean political upheaval in some respects. Many politicians and top tier military brass will be exposed if the goal is to truly combat and neutralize Boko Haram. It will be messy (and bloody).

The question is, what took them so long to arrive here? It’s common sense. After the Chibok kidnappings, I said this was the only logical course of action. Quite a few people disagreed with me as they felt that western intervention was best. I disagreed with that opinion then and I disagree with it now. We’ve got to change the way we think in times of crisis, but that’s another story for another day.

This is a problem that can only be fixed by regional forces. It must be fixed from within. Western intervention beyond intelligence or supplying surveillance equipment means two things;

1. An eventual abandonment or exodus which does nothing long term.

2. Permanent or long term occupation which is never a good thing. This will ultimately lead to even more problems. 

Let’s wait and see. That’s all we can do. These developments are long overdue.

Inside Nigeria's Baby Factories »

thefemaletyrant:

"Do you want the baby with or without the placenta?" The woman who calls herself “Mama” looks at us and clairifies whether we want a “fresh” baby. 

We meet her in the dark and simple office of her half-burned baby factory.  She thinks we want to buy a baby, but in fact we are carrying a hidden camera. 

Every year, the Nigerian police discover several new baby factories. Women are held captive to give birth to babies destined to be sold illegally either to adoptive parents, rituals, or slavery.  Large parts of the trade are conducted locally in Nigeria, but the police suspect that children also have been sold to Europe and the USA.

Nevertheless, many countries continue to adopt children from Nigeria. Since 2008, at least 78 Nigerian adoptions have occurred in Sweden, according to statistics from Adoptionscentrum. These children have special needs and are most probably not from the baby factories, but the phenomenon is well known. International adoption agencies claim that the children, their parents and the entire adoption process is overseen by the Nigerian government. But in Nigeria there are no such guaranties.

Today, in an exclusive story, Expressen reveals how the baby-trafficking from Nigeria works.

With a hidden camera, we have infiltrated several of the baby factories in southern Nigeria. To get access to the factories, we claimed to be interested in buying a child and that we wanted to meet the pregnant women in order to choose the mother of our baby, and also that we were from an organization called Home of Hope that wanted to have future business relations with the baby factories.

It takes us just three days to establish contact with several agents that are part of the baby trafficking networks. They claim to be able to get us babies by the following day. One of the agents mentions that an infant, due to be born in a couple of days, is meant to go to a couple in Spain but could be ours since we are on location.

“They won’t notice if they get another baby,” says Frank, the agent that we meet in the city of Umuahia.

“Do you want a girl or a boy? Twins perhaps?”

We say that we want to go to the factories, see the women, and then decide if we want to go through with the deal.

“Oh, that is hard. There has been a lot of trouble with the police and the women are hidden. But we give them food, shelter and sleep with them so they keep calm. I’m a father to many of the sold children, haha. But I’m going to try to solve this.”

The next day we meet up with another agent in the city of Aba. She knows of many baby factories and immediately gives us the addresses.

The first baby factory we visit is situated in a small village, an hour outside of Aba. It’s hot and we’re nervous. We are on our way to meet people who are willing to sell children for money, in other words hardened criminals. We are worried that they are going to discover the hidden camera or not believe our cover-story about Home of Hope. We have already decided it is worth the risk. The tall gate is locked when we arrive. We park the car close to the wall to ensure an escape route if we are caught. Finally a guard opens the gate. Almost all buildings are burnt to the ground and two Volvos have been scrapped in the yard. Over the car doors small children’s shirts are hung to dry. Behind one of the burnt down walls we can spot a couple of mattresses and a fire with a pot hanging over it. A couple of minutes later we see the first pregnant woman. After a short period of time we have counted five pregnant women pacing back and forth.

An older woman enters through the gate. She introduces herself as “Mama” and asks us to follow her to the office. We explain our business. She lights up when we start talking business and dollars.

“I have five women here but 35 in another house in Umuahia. You can go there and see. But we have to talk to my son ‘cause we run this together,” she says.

She tells us that she charges 4000 dollar for a girl and 4400 dollar for a boy.

“I give the girls food and shelter and help them with their physical exams. The same day they give birth they go away, she says.”

She claims to be able to get children of all ages and genders and at any time. She can also arrange court orders and deal with the police.

“I delivered three babies yesterday and they have already been picked up by Nigerians.”

A hidden camera investigation into the world of baby factories in South-Eastern Nigeria.

Nigerian media can be absurd at times. What kind of ridiculous question is this? Chimamanda is an Igbo woman. That’s who she is. How can she be trying too hard to be Igbo? Is she eating too much yam? Yahweh take the wheel…

Nigerian media can be absurd at times. What kind of ridiculous question is this? Chimamanda is an Igbo woman. That’s who she is. How can she be trying too hard to be Igbo? Is she eating too much yam? Yahweh take the wheel…

dynamicafrica:

Great Concern As Parents of Missing #Chibok Schoolgirls Tragically Pass Away.
This headline is so shocking and heartbreaking it’s almost unbelievable. 11 parents of the missing Chibok schoolgirls have died or have been killed in the three months since their abduction.
According to a report by AP, seven of the girls’ fathers were among over 50 bodies that were brought to a hospital in the area after an attack on the nearby village of Kautakari this month. Four more parents are said to have died from heart failure, high blood pressure and other illnesses many blame on the trauma sustained from this incident.
Speaking out on this issue, community leader Pogo Bitrus has said, “one father of two of the girls kidnapped just went into a kind of coma and kept repeating the names of his daughters, until life left him.”
Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan, who has been heavily criticized for his slow response and the ineffective manner in which he has been handling both this situation and the greater Boko Haram threat, met with some of the victim’s parents and their classmates on Tuesday where he promised to continue efforts to bring back the girls alive.
Meanwhile, the town of Chibok seems to be in more and more danger as Boko Haram continue to gain ground in the surrounding area. Over the weekend, the terrorist group launched several raids in northeastern Nigerian towns and villages where they also attacked an army base in the strategic town of Damboa. This particular attack saw as many as 15, 000 civilians fleeing the area as a result.
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dynamicafrica:

Great Concern As Parents of Missing #Chibok Schoolgirls Tragically Pass Away.

This headline is so shocking and heartbreaking it’s almost unbelievable. 11 parents of the missing Chibok schoolgirls have died or have been killed in the three months since their abduction.

According to a report by AP, seven of the girls’ fathers were among over 50 bodies that were brought to a hospital in the area after an attack on the nearby village of Kautakari this month. Four more parents are said to have died from heart failure, high blood pressure and other illnesses many blame on the trauma sustained from this incident.

Speaking out on this issue, community leader Pogo Bitrus has said, “one father of two of the girls kidnapped just went into a kind of coma and kept repeating the names of his daughters, until life left him.”

Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan, who has been heavily criticized for his slow response and the ineffective manner in which he has been handling both this situation and the greater Boko Haram threat, met with some of the victim’s parents and their classmates on Tuesday where he promised to continue efforts to bring back the girls alive.

Meanwhile, the town of Chibok seems to be in more and more danger as Boko Haram continue to gain ground in the surrounding area. Over the weekend, the terrorist group launched several raids in northeastern Nigerian towns and villages where they also attacked an army base in the strategic town of Damboa. This particular attack saw as many as 15, 000 civilians fleeing the area as a result.

Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | PinterestSoundcloud | Mixcloud