themaninthegreenshirt:

"I don’t see why our music can’t be given the same respect of European classical music. Beethoven’s been dead all these years and they’re still talking about him, teaching him, and playing his music. Why ain’t they talking about Bird, or Trane, or Monk, or Duke, or Count, or Fletcher Henderson, or Louis Armstrong like they’re talking about Beethoven? Shit, their music is classical." Miles Davis [pic by Herman Leonard]

We know why Miles, we know why.

themaninthegreenshirt:

"I don’t see why our music can’t be given the same respect of European classical music. Beethoven’s been dead all these years and they’re still talking about him, teaching him, and playing his music. Why ain’t they talking about Bird, or Trane, or Monk, or Duke, or Count, or Fletcher Henderson, or Louis Armstrong like they’re talking about Beethoven? Shit, their music is classical." Miles Davis [pic by Herman Leonard]

We know why Miles, we know why.

(via jazzrelatedstuff)

nerdscloset:

Miles Davis covered in blood after an altercation with police

"Altercation" sounds so polite, like it was a mutual thing and not one man getting assaulted by the police. Miles got beat up by the police.
The cops assaulted Miles because he was black. He was standing outside Birdland where he just performed and was taking a break. His name was on the marquee. They saw him escort a white female friend from the club into a taxi and then they approached him after as he was taking a smoke break. The cops told him to “move on”. Miles said he was playing at the club and was on break. They weren’t hearing any of that. One cop then punched him in the stomach, while another one cracked him on the head with a nightstick. That’s why he’s covered in blood. He was a victim of police brutality.

nerdscloset:

Miles Davis covered in blood after an altercation with police

"Altercation" sounds so polite, like it was a mutual thing and not one man getting assaulted by the police. Miles got beat up by the police.

The cops assaulted Miles because he was black. He was standing outside Birdland where he just performed and was taking a break. His name was on the marquee. They saw him escort a white female friend from the club into a taxi and then they approached him after as he was taking a smoke break. The cops told him to “move on”. Miles said he was playing at the club and was on break. They weren’t hearing any of that. One cop then punched him in the stomach, while another one cracked him on the head with a nightstick. That’s why he’s covered in blood. He was a victim of police brutality.

(via jazzrelatedstuff)

Miles Davis - E.S.P.

Miles Davis - E.S.P.

Miles Davis - Four & More

Miles Davis - Four & More

cordjefferson:

Just a bro at the gym.

I love Miles Davis.

cordjefferson:

Just a bro at the gym.

I love Miles Davis.

(via jowcol)

Photographer Lee Tanner has died. He was 82. Pictured above are photos of John Coltrane, Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, and Thelonious Monk taken by Tanner.

Read a writeup on Tanner at Jazz Times here.

INTERVIEW WITH MILES DAVIS - August 9th, 1974 »

Perhaps one of the realest Miles Davis interviews I’ve ever read. The interviewer is John Runcie. Some snippets.

JR: I know you said just now that you didn’t particularly want to talk about the 1940s just because you can’t remember that much about that period.

MD: Well I mean it’s useless to talk about the 40s- what the fuck was in the 40s.

JR: How did your relationship with Charlie Parker begin?

MD: Everybody knows that. Why are you asking me shit like that? I don’t want to talk about the 40s; that’s all dead and gone. Talk about today.

JR: Do critics matter at all to you?

MD: No! I don’t care what they say. Because they’re all white, they can’t understand black music.

JR: To what extent is that record the creation of your producer Teo Macero? Do you approve of the control he has in editing and putting the whole thing together?

MD: It’s not his creation. It was already together. He didn’t do shit. It was together, what the fuck is he going to do about it? It’s already there man. When we make the recording, it’s there. I tell the guy what to do in the control room. Raise the bass, do this, do that. When we get through making the date, it’s finished. He has nothing to do with it. The only reason I use a producer is because he’s white. He can talk to white people and white people don’t listen to black people. That’s the only fucking reason.

Full read here. Via Nicholas Payton.

Miles Davis and Philly Joe Jones at Peacock Alley - St. Louis, 1956. Photograph by Bernie Thrasher. © “Cactus” Charlie Menees Collection, Department of Special Collections, Miller Nichols Library, University of Missouri – Kansas City. (source)

Miles Davis and Philly Joe Jones at Peacock Alley - St. Louis, 1956. Photograph by Bernie Thrasher. © “Cactus” Charlie Menees Collection, Department of Special Collections, Miller Nichols Library, University of Missouri – Kansas City. (source)

poboh:

Miles Davis, Salle Pleyel, Paris, 1946, Jean-Pierre Leloir. (1931 - 2010)

poboh:

Miles Davis, Salle Pleyel, Paris, 1946, Jean-Pierre Leloir. (1931 - 2010)

(via blackjatovia)

artemisvoice:

Miles Davis, 1969

Guy Le Querrec

Paris, 8th arrondissement.  Miles Davis at the Salle Pleyel concert hall. (for Magnum photos)

(via jazzrelatedstuff)

The Miles Davis Quintet - The Great Prestige Recordings

The Miles Davis Quintet - The Great Prestige Recordings

Some framed Herman Leonard prints.

Click here to see more photos. Please leave source link intact.

Miles Davis on Steve Miller

“I remember one time - it might have been a couple times - at the Fillmore East in 1970, I was opening for this sorry-ass cat named Steve Miller. Steve Miller didn’t have his shit going for him, so I’m pissed because I got to open for this non-playing motherfucker just because he had one or two sorry-ass records out. So I would come late and he would have to go on first and then we got there we smoked the motherfucking place, everybody dug it.”

Miles Davis keeping it real.

vieilles-annonces:

Miles Davis and Bride Frances in Chicago - Jet Magazine January 21, 1960 on Flickr.

vieilles-annonces:

Miles Davis and Bride Frances in Chicago - Jet Magazine January 21, 1960 on Flickr.

bainer:

Miles Davis - My Funny Valentine (1964)

As quoted from Miles Davis’ website:

Just before going on stage, Miles informed his companions that the quintet’s purse would go to three civil rights organizations supporting voter registration of Blacks in the South. The musicians contested this charitable gesture forced upon them. Miles, who liked to provoke his collaborators, never doubted that the concert’s intensity originated in the musicians’ negative feelings. This exceptional concert was released on two records: the first, in 1965, brought together the evening’s four ballads—pure transcendence from start to finish—along with “All Blues” (whose second introduction contains Miles’ most explicit reference to the first notes of his 80s’ hit “Jean Pierre”). But the two masterpieces on the record are “My Funny Valentine” and “Stella By Starlight,” two great instances of musical eroticism during which the melodies, harmonic frame, and tempos are simultaneously unveiled and disguised, to the point of inciting a cry of ecstasy—during the introduction to “Stella”—from someone in the first rows, who was none other than the singer Babs Gonzales.

Recorded live at Philharmonic Hall, Lincoln Center, NYC on February 12, 1964 at a benefit concert for voter registration in Mississippi and Louisiana sponsored by the NAACP Defense Fund, The Congress for Racial Equality, and the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee.

Poetry in sound. 

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