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#Miles Davis

atane:

The Musings of Miles in 1955 was an album that finally began showcasing the future path Miles would take with his groups. The album included Red Garland and Philly Joe Jones, two-thirds of his rhythm section that rounded out the group that went on to be known as the first Great Quintet.
*It should be noted that Miles recorded an album called “Blues Moods” with Charles Mingus and Elvin Jones a month after The Musings of Miles. It was on Mingus’ short lived record label, Debut Records. It was a fairly low key release.*

This record started a very fruitful relationship between Philly Joe and Miles.

atane:

The Musings of Miles in 1955 was an album that finally began showcasing the future path Miles would take with his groups. The album included Red Garland and Philly Joe Jones, two-thirds of his rhythm section that rounded out the group that went on to be known as the first Great Quintet.

*It should be noted that Miles recorded an album called “Blues Moods” with Charles Mingus and Elvin Jones a month after The Musings of Miles. It was on Mingus’ short lived record label, Debut Records. It was a fairly low key release.*

This record started a very fruitful relationship between Philly Joe and Miles.

mosaicrecords:

Discovered: Clifford Brown Radio Interview

This is an extraordinary discovery. A full six-minute Clifford Brown audio interview made by Willis Conover for Voice Of America. This is the first time I’ve ever heard his voice and it is as gentle and confident as I always imagined his personality would be. A fascinating and revealing find!

-Michael Cuscuna

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The interviewer asked him if he was familiar with Fats Navarro…lol

There would be no Brownie without Fats.

bainer:

Miles Davis and wife Cecily Tyson at the Schiphol Aiport in Amsterdam, April 27, 1982 (photo by Marcel Antonisse)

Miles rocking the goatee.

bainer:

Miles Davis and wife Cecily Tyson at the Schiphol Aiport in Amsterdam, April 27, 1982 (photo by Marcel Antonisse)

Miles rocking the goatee.

fuckyeahdegeneracy:

atane:

Born on this day: Miles Davis
Photo by Bob Cato

wtf ive never seen Davis look this young

He’s not that young here. This photo was taken in 1968, so Miles was around 42 in the photo. To put it in perspective, this is almost 25 years after his early days playing with Charlie Parker.

fuckyeahdegeneracy:

atane:

Born on this day: Miles Davis

Photo by Bob Cato

wtf ive never seen Davis look this young

He’s not that young here. This photo was taken in 1968, so Miles was around 42 in the photo. To put it in perspective, this is almost 25 years after his early days playing with Charlie Parker.

themaninthegreenshirt:

"I don’t see why our music can’t be given the same respect of European classical music. Beethoven’s been dead all these years and they’re still talking about him, teaching him, and playing his music. Why ain’t they talking about Bird, or Trane, or Monk, or Duke, or Count, or Fletcher Henderson, or Louis Armstrong like they’re talking about Beethoven? Shit, their music is classical." Miles Davis [pic by Herman Leonard]

We know why Miles, we know why.

themaninthegreenshirt:

"I don’t see why our music can’t be given the same respect of European classical music. Beethoven’s been dead all these years and they’re still talking about him, teaching him, and playing his music. Why ain’t they talking about Bird, or Trane, or Monk, or Duke, or Count, or Fletcher Henderson, or Louis Armstrong like they’re talking about Beethoven? Shit, their music is classical." Miles Davis [pic by Herman Leonard]

We know why Miles, we know why.

nerdscloset:

Miles Davis covered in blood after an altercation with police

"Altercation" sounds so polite, like it was a mutual thing and not one man getting assaulted by the police. Miles got beat up by the police.
The cops assaulted Miles because he was black. He was standing outside Birdland where he just performed and was taking a break. His name was on the marquee. They saw him escort a white female friend from the club into a taxi and then they approached him after as he was taking a smoke break. The cops told him to “move on”. Miles said he was playing at the club and was on break. They weren’t hearing any of that. One cop then punched him in the stomach, while another one cracked him on the head with a nightstick. That’s why he’s covered in blood. He was a victim of police brutality.

nerdscloset:

Miles Davis covered in blood after an altercation with police

"Altercation" sounds so polite, like it was a mutual thing and not one man getting assaulted by the police. Miles got beat up by the police.

The cops assaulted Miles because he was black. He was standing outside Birdland where he just performed and was taking a break. His name was on the marquee. They saw him escort a white female friend from the club into a taxi and then they approached him after as he was taking a smoke break. The cops told him to “move on”. Miles said he was playing at the club and was on break. They weren’t hearing any of that. One cop then punched him in the stomach, while another one cracked him on the head with a nightstick. That’s why he’s covered in blood. He was a victim of police brutality.

Photographer Lee Tanner has died. He was 82. Pictured above are photos of John Coltrane, Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, and Thelonious Monk taken by Tanner.

Read a writeup on Tanner at Jazz Times here.

INTERVIEW WITH MILES DAVIS - August 9th, 1974 »

Perhaps one of the realest Miles Davis interviews I’ve ever read. The interviewer is John Runcie. Some snippets.

JR: I know you said just now that you didn’t particularly want to talk about the 1940s just because you can’t remember that much about that period.

MD: Well I mean it’s useless to talk about the 40s- what the fuck was in the 40s.

JR: How did your relationship with Charlie Parker begin?

MD: Everybody knows that. Why are you asking me shit like that? I don’t want to talk about the 40s; that’s all dead and gone. Talk about today.

JR: Do critics matter at all to you?

MD: No! I don’t care what they say. Because they’re all white, they can’t understand black music.

JR: To what extent is that record the creation of your producer Teo Macero? Do you approve of the control he has in editing and putting the whole thing together?

MD: It’s not his creation. It was already together. He didn’t do shit. It was together, what the fuck is he going to do about it? It’s already there man. When we make the recording, it’s there. I tell the guy what to do in the control room. Raise the bass, do this, do that. When we get through making the date, it’s finished. He has nothing to do with it. The only reason I use a producer is because he’s white. He can talk to white people and white people don’t listen to black people. That’s the only fucking reason.

Full read here. Via Nicholas Payton.

Miles Davis and Philly Joe Jones at Peacock Alley - St. Louis, 1956. Photograph by Bernie Thrasher. © “Cactus” Charlie Menees Collection, Department of Special Collections, Miller Nichols Library, University of Missouri – Kansas City. (source)

Miles Davis and Philly Joe Jones at Peacock Alley - St. Louis, 1956. Photograph by Bernie Thrasher. © “Cactus” Charlie Menees Collection, Department of Special Collections, Miller Nichols Library, University of Missouri – Kansas City. (source)