nprfreshair:

Starting in the late 1960s, jazz saxophonist Clifford Jordan produced a series of recordings mostly by other leaders, that were released on the musicians-owned Strata-East label. Those seven albums are now collected in a box set, The Complete Clifford Jordan Strata-East Sessions, on six CDs from Mosaic. The sound on these albums is just OK, but they all feature fiery playing, original material, and great and underappreciated players—especially rhythm players.
Kevin Whitehead reviews the box set The Complete Clifford Jordan Strata-East Sessions  

Misinformation on tumblr is a growing problem, and even NPR isn’t immune. The musician in the photo above isn’t Clifford Jordan. That is Jimmy Heath.
Amazingly, not a single person who reblogged this noticed that the musician in the photo isn’t Clifford Jordan. Clifford Jordan and Jimmy Heath don’t exactly look alike either.
This is why companies need to hire people who are knowledgeable about this music and the musicians. Having someone knowledgeable at the helm is crucial because misinformation spreads rapidly. Of course, this also means you’ll have to pay them commensurate to their knowledge base. When you don’t have that approach, you just might end up with someone who will publicly use a mislabeled google image, further propagating misinformation to the masses.

nprfreshair:

Starting in the late 1960s, jazz saxophonist Clifford Jordan produced a series of recordings mostly by other leaders, that were released on the musicians-owned Strata-East label. Those seven albums are now collected in a box set, The Complete Clifford Jordan Strata-East Sessions, on six CDs from Mosaic. The sound on these albums is just OK, but they all feature fiery playing, original material, and great and underappreciated players—especially rhythm players.

Kevin Whitehead reviews the box set The Complete Clifford Jordan Strata-East Sessions
 

Misinformation on tumblr is a growing problem, and even NPR isn’t immune. The musician in the photo above isn’t Clifford Jordan. That is Jimmy Heath.

Amazingly, not a single person who reblogged this noticed that the musician in the photo isn’t Clifford Jordan. Clifford Jordan and Jimmy Heath don’t exactly look alike either.

This is why companies need to hire people who are knowledgeable about this music and the musicians. Having someone knowledgeable at the helm is crucial because misinformation spreads rapidly. Of course, this also means you’ll have to pay them commensurate to their knowledge base. When you don’t have that approach, you just might end up with someone who will publicly use a mislabeled google image, further propagating misinformation to the masses.

bainer:

Art Farmer with Clifford Jordan during Jordan’s Cliff Craft session, Hackensack NJ, November 10 1957 (photo by Francis Wolff)

bainer:

Art Farmer with Clifford Jordan during Jordan’s Cliff Craft session, Hackensack NJ, November 10 1957 (photo by Francis Wolff)

Cliff Jordan
Photo by Francis Wolff

Cliff Jordan

Photo by Francis Wolff

John Gilmore, Cliff Jordan, Curly Russell, and Horace Silver.
Photo by Francis Wolff

John Gilmore, Cliff Jordan, Curly Russell, and Horace Silver.

Photo by Francis Wolff

Essential Listening: Cliff Jordan - Cliff Craft

Max Roach - Garvey’s Ghost

Paul Chambers Quintet. Microgroove action.

Essential Listening: Cliff Jordan and John Gilmore - Blowing in from Chicago
A special album that is led by two tenors. Joining Jordan and Gilmore are Art Blakey, Horace Silver and Curly Russell.

Essential Listening: Cliff Jordan and John Gilmore - Blowing in from Chicago

A special album that is led by two tenors. Joining Jordan and Gilmore are Art Blakey, Horace Silver and Curly Russell.

A riveting performance of ‘Buhaina’s Delight’ by Art Blakey and The Jazz Messengers. This performance is special because it features John Gilmore on the tenor sax front and center. Gilmore was a monster player who never became famous. However, his signature sound is evident in many players, most notably John Coltrane. Coltrane took lessons from Gilmore in the late 50s. When Coltrane seeks you out for tutelage, then you are the real deal. The best example of Gilmore’s influence on Coltrane is on the song ‘Chasin’ the Trane’. It appears on the Live at the Village Vanguard album.

A big part of the reason why Gilmore never became famous was because for most of his career, he chose to play in Sun Ra’s Arkestra. It certainly wasn’t because he wasn’t in demand, he was. Nevertheless, he had some excellent dates on Blue Note records with Andrew Hill and Cliff Jordan.