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#Charlie Parker

atane:

For Bird Fans: Charlie Parker at Storyville.
This LP was originally a broadcast for a Boston radio station in 1953. It was later released on Blue Note records. It should be noted that Parker was never signed to Blue Note records. They just had the rights to the broadcast.
This LP is a great way to listen to a live recording of Bird’s later period.

Bird on Blue Note.

atane:

For Bird Fans: Charlie Parker at Storyville.

This LP was originally a broadcast for a Boston radio station in 1953. It was later released on Blue Note records. It should be noted that Parker was never signed to Blue Note records. They just had the rights to the broadcast.

This LP is a great way to listen to a live recording of Bird’s later period.

Bird on Blue Note.

fuckyeahdegeneracy:

atane:

Born on this day: Miles Davis
Photo by Bob Cato

wtf ive never seen Davis look this young

He’s not that young here. This photo was taken in 1968, so Miles was around 42 in the photo. To put it in perspective, this is almost 25 years after his early days playing with Charlie Parker.

fuckyeahdegeneracy:

atane:

Born on this day: Miles Davis

Photo by Bob Cato

wtf ive never seen Davis look this young

He’s not that young here. This photo was taken in 1968, so Miles was around 42 in the photo. To put it in perspective, this is almost 25 years after his early days playing with Charlie Parker.

satchelpage97:

Dear Internet,
To the left is Big Jay McNeely. He is still alive. To the right is Charlie Parker. He transitioned nearly 60 years ago. #WeDoNotAllLookAlike #BirdNeverPlayedTheSaxLyingOnHisBack #UnlessHeWasZootedOutOfHisMind

satchelpage97:

Dear Internet,

To the left is Big Jay McNeely. He is still alive. To the right is Charlie Parker. He transitioned nearly 60 years ago. #WeDoNotAllLookAlike #BirdNeverPlayedTheSaxLyingOnHisBack #UnlessHeWasZootedOutOfHisMind

Born on this day: Charlie Parker
Photo by Eliot Elisofon for LIFE Magazine (source)

Born on this day: Charlie Parker

Photo by Eliot Elisofon for LIFE Magazine (source)

“To the best of my knowledge, Sonny Rollins, Sonny Stitt, myself, Jimmy Heath, John Coltrane, we called ourselves the ‘Five Brothers’, you know, the five black brothers. We all started playing alto, but Charlie Parker was such a monster that we all gave up and switched to tenor.”

Hank Mobley, Downbeat 1973 interview via Mosaic

Leave it alone smooth jazz. Just leave it alone.

I recently heard a smooth jazz version of what sounded like Charlie Parker’s ‘Ah-Leu-Cha’. I was so disgusted. They keep going back, desecrating this music’s finest moments with this crap. Like the recent smooth jazz album “re-imagining” John Coltrane’s work. Everything is up for grabs it seems. Smooth jazz can’t leave things alone. It has to smear its crap everywhere it goes.

Who in their right mind thinks “I like Trane & Bird. If only there was a way to make their music cheesy, dumb & dull, I’d like it even more!” I can’t think of anything more unimaginative than this. Who is buying this crap? What is wrong with Coltrane and Bird as they were?

I remember hearing a smooth jazz version of Lee Morgan’s The Sidewinder a while ago. Is it not catchy enough? A part of me died when I heard it. Not just because they had the balls to do it, but because it was so terrible. Just awful. Completely void of the upbeat, fun and catchy vibe of the original, making it even more pointless. Why do they insist on peddling this garbage? For the love of all that is good, why?

Born on this day: Charlie Parker
Photo by William Gottlieb

Born on this day: Charlie Parker

Photo by William Gottlieb

Carve out an hour of your time to watch this documentary on Charlie Parker. 

BIRD LIVES!

Sonny Rollins discusses Miles, Trane, Monk and Bird.

Click here to watch the other vid.

Miles Davis plays Al Cohn, circa 1953. Kenny Clarke is brilliant on this 10” LP. I’ve been revisiting old Miles Davis albums, back to his stints with Charlie Parker and Benny Carter. I could listen to this stuff all day, and I often do. This period of Miles is his most neglected for some reason.

Miles Davis plays Al Cohn, circa 1953. Kenny Clarke is brilliant on this 10” LP. I’ve been revisiting old Miles Davis albums, back to his stints with Charlie Parker and Benny Carter. I could listen to this stuff all day, and I often do. This period of Miles is his most neglected for some reason.