bainer:

Charles Mingus and his band (pictured: Horace Parlan, Shafi Hadi/Curtis Porter, and Booker Ervin) performing live at the Five Spot Cafe, NYC, 1958 (photos by Dennis Stock)

Based on how uninterested the crowd is, despite having these geniuses in front of them, I completely understand why Mingus went off on them.

Born on this day: Booker Ervin
The Texas tenor man is mostly known for his collaborations with Charles Mingus. However, he recorded extensively as a leader, most notably for Prestige records. His late work on Blue Note records is highly regarded as well.
One stand out LP in his discography is That’s It! on Candid Records. It’s an underrated classic. It features Horace Parlan, George Tucker, and Al Harewood.

Born on this day: Booker Ervin

The Texas tenor man is mostly known for his collaborations with Charles Mingus. However, he recorded extensively as a leader, most notably for Prestige records. His late work on Blue Note records is highly regarded as well.

One stand out LP in his discography is That’s It! on Candid Records. It’s an underrated classic. It features Horace Parlan, George Tucker, and Al Harewood.

Jaki Byard recorded quite a bit with Charles Mingus and Booker Ervin. He also recorded with Eric Dolphy and Dannie Richmond. Ervin, Dolphy, Richmond and Byard all played in various Mingus lineups, so these men knew each other quite well. All their recordings are great, but one recording that really shows the dexterity and sheer genius of Jaki Byard is ‘Fuchsia Swing Song' on Blue Note records by Sam Rivers. I can't recommend it enough. Every reissue of it ends up going out of print. That should tell you something.

(Source: youtube.com)