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A cop may have put a pregnant woman in a chokehold during a struggle in Brooklyn »

artisfreed0m:

titspirationall:

atane:

So the NYPD is at it again. This time they have choked a 7 month pregnant Black woman. Her offense? She was grilling in front of her house. This is over a damn grill.

Right on cue, people are already talking about the NYPD needing sensitivity training etc. They don’t get it. This is what the NYPD does. It’s not about a lack of training. They are looking for any reason to inflict fear and escalate a situation so they can use as much force as possible. I don’t know how many more incidents need to happen to make it click in their heads that the police is terrorizing Black communities. How much more ridiculous do these situations need to get? You tell me what warrants choking a pregnant woman for grilling in front of her house. Damn whether that is not allowed or not. You know what you do in that situation as a cop? You give her a citation or a fine. Not the NYPD, they choke and assault pregnant Black women.

This makes me think of the post that was going around a little while ago that said that kids should be taught to hate the cops because even a “good cop” does horrible things as “part of the job.” As Atane said, this is what they do! They intimidate, harass, escalate, and assault. that is what the police do. all day long.

I believe and agree that we are falling into a police state. I’ve seen the recent videos of chokeholds. Before I say more I would like to mention that in the NYPD the supervisors are the ones with tasers, not normal officers. That being said, when someone is violently resisting arrest they use hands. They don’t have other non-lethal force besides their hands and a nightstick, at least to my knowledge, that they can use. If you know that you are innocent then let lawyers do the talking for you because, as everyone knows, what you say will be held against you. And any fighting with an officer will cause suspicion. I mean, that’s just common sense. I’m by no means saying that what they did was right, and they broke police code as well. The cops should very well be punished for this. But to say that all cops are bad is extremely biased. Just as biased as making racial slurs. Cops are humans too, and will provide help if deserved. No one wants to help an asshole in any instance. So until they start barging into homes without warrants, indefinitely detaining you, not provide a lawyer, shooting and killing an innocent person, then hate them as a person. Not all cops will do these things. Believe it or not some cops actually want to uphold the law in the way it was supposed to be.

Will we ever get to a point when someone doesn’t chime in to say “not all cops”? The system is corrupt. Individual “good cops” are irrelevant. They are part of a system. Being a good cop doesn’t negate arrests and citations based on quotas, stop and frisk (don’t kid yourself about it being over), “broken windows” policies, Rockefeller drug laws etc. Good cops enforce those things everyday. The system is broken (or rather working as intended) and it targets Black people specifically. This is a systemic problem. White bankers aren’t being choked out in public for minor infractions. Black people are. Stop and frisk was literally the NYPD violating the rights of Black people on the street. Stop talking about good cops.

Ask yourself what’s constructive about anything you said. When people are subjected to systematic brutality, there are always those who chime in to say “not all”, as if that’s in anyway meaningful. Go and tell Eric Garner about good cops. They all watched him die on a sidewalk when one of their colleagues illegally choked him and they all pounced on him and slammed his head on the sidewalk. Where were the good officers to stop officer Pantaleo? Also, good cops are relative. They might be wonderful in your community, but they are terrors in another.

As a word of advice, when people are highlighting injustice and victimization, it’s not a cue for you to tell people that “not all” of the group that brutalizes them are bad. Would you go to a women’s rape crisis center to say that not all men rape? Do you have to do that? It’s an assholish thing to do. Maybe you don’t know that. Consider this me telling you that it’s an asshole move. Are you an asshole? If not, then stop acting like one by injecting the tired and unnecessary “not all” commentary. No one cares about “not all” in a system that is brutal and oppressive.

In Labor, In Chains: The Outrageous Shackling of Pregnant Inmates »

EARLY one morning in November 2011, Tina Tinen, a pregnant prisoner at the Bedford Hills Correctional Facility in Westchester County, N.Y., woke with painful contractions. Guards called an ambulance to take her to the hospital and, according to her account, shackled her wrist to the bar of a gurney — despite a 2009 state law against shackling pregnant inmates during and after labor.

Ms. Tinen, who was serving time for a nonviolent drug offense, had been placed in restraints frequently throughout her pregnancy. A few weeks earlier, wearing handcuffs and ankle irons, she had slipped and fallen on icy pavement. Although she was now suffering considerable labor pain, guards refused to unshackle her until she reached the hospital bed, 15 minutes before she gave birth.

Not long after that, in July 2012, another Bedford Hills prisoner, Jacqueline McDougall, was shackled on the return trip to the prison after giving birth in Westchester Medical Center. Although Ms. McDougall had undergone an emergency cesarean section and had needed a blood transfusion, her handcuffs were linked to a chain around her waist and clamped together over her sutured incision, she recalled. “With the weight on the stomach,” she said, “it felt like they were ripping open my C-section.”

Ms. Tinen and Ms. McDougall are not isolated cases. A report to be released in September by the Correctional Association of New York, a nonprofit group that monitors prison conditions, indicates that such shackling is common. Of 27 women whom the association surveyed who had given birth in New York prisons since the passage of the 2009 law, 23 reported having been shackled just before, during or after their delivery.

“The law was put in place because New York State recognized that these practices are an affront to human rights and decency,” said Tamar Kraft-Stolar, director of the association’s Women in Prison Project. “The fact that it’s being routinely violated is egregious.”

A spokesman for the Department of Corrections and Community Supervision in New York declined to comment on the report.

This is a multistate problem. Over the last 15 years, 21 states have enacted laws against shackling pregnant inmates during and after labor, but many of the laws have proved ineffectual. In interviews with former inmates, prison officials and medical providers — and in records acquired through freedom of information requests — I have found evidence of negligence in the implementation of these laws across the country.

Although it is estimated that only about 2,000 prisoners in American correctional facilities give birth each year, the issue raises a broader concern about excessively punitive aspects of prison culture. Democratic and Republican politicians alike have pushed for anti-shackling legislation. Doctors have called shackling a threat to the health of both mother and child. Criminologists have deemed it unnecessary, as it appears that no unshackled pregnant inmate has ever escaped during labor.

But in many correctional systems, doctors, guards and prison officials simply are not told about anti-shackling laws, or are not trained to comply. In Illinois, improperly trained guards continued to shackle women for years after such a law was passed in 1999. After some 80 prisoners in Cook County brought a class-action lawsuit, the state in 2012 passed legislation strengthening protections in the county. (The suit was settled for $4.1 million.) But downstate, an unpublished survey of county jails by Chicago Legal Advocacy for Incarcerated Mothers cites 20 institutions that don’t have written policies that fully comply with the statewide law. Corrections officials would not comment on these allegations but said that they expect each county facility to meet all existing standards.

Even California, an early adopter of anti-shackling legislation, has struggled to effectively implement its original 2005 law and an updated 2012 law. A report this year from Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, in San Francisco, found that a majority of California county correctional facilities had yet to implement proper written policies. Confronted with these findings, the Board of State and Community Corrections noted that there have been no incidents of shackling under the new law, that they are inspecting for compliance and that a review meeting to create standards for the jails is scheduled for later this year.

Inadequate implementation isn’t the only problem. The language of some of the laws gives wide latitude to corrections officers to use restraints if they identify security risks. In theory, this should improve safety, but in practice, it creates opportunities for the continuation of shackling.

In Pennsylvania, files provided by the state corrections department document just over 100 incidents in which women were shackled from July 2012 to June 2013, with security or risk of flight usually cited as the reason. But according to a recent report from the A.C.L.U. of Pennsylvania, hospital staff members report routinely seeing pregnant prisoners handcuffed in the hospital and during delivery.

Nationwide, perhaps the most prominent case is that of Valerie Nabors, who sued the state of Nevada after giving birth in its prison system three years ago. The state had previously outlawed restraints during labor and delivery. Ms. Nabors was serving a sentence at the Florence McClure Women’s Correctional Center in Las Vegas for stealing more than $250 in casino chips, and was not deemed a high flight risk.

According to the complaint, when Ms. Nabors went into labor, a prison nurse called an ambulance and Ms. Nabors was handcuffed and taken to the vehicle. Then officers shackled her ankles together. An ambulance supervisor protested, explaining that if Ms. Nabors’s water broke or complications developed, the supervisor would not have proper access to help her. Officers refused to remove the restraints.

At the hospital, a nurse also questioned the use of the shackles. The officers again refused to remove them. At the insistence of a delivery room nurse, they relented. Ms. Nabors gave birth to a daughter through an emergency cesarean section, but within 10 minutes she was placed back in ankle shackles and chained to the bed.

Doctors later found that Ms. Nabors had suffered several pulled muscles in her groin. X-rays revealed a separation of her pubic bones. Her physician concluded that the injuries were a direct result of the restraints. “We were shocked,” Staci Pratt of the A.C.L.U. of Nevada said of Ms. Nabors’s experience. “And it takes a lot to shock an A.C.L.U. attorney.”

Victims of illegal shackling rarely litigate, often because of feelings of shame or fear of repercussions. But Ms. Pratt helped Ms. Nabors bring a case against the Nevada Department of Corrections in 2012. This January, the state paid a settlement of $130,000.

Two months later, the Nevada Board of State Prison Commissioners adopted new regulations for oversight, including training requirements for corrections officers and investigatory obligations for the state.

Danyell Williams, a former doula for prisoners in Philadelphia, says that such lawsuits are crucial to ensuring proper compliance with anti-shackling laws. “These laws were passed,” she said, “and everybody patted themselves on the back for doing what was right and human and then went on about their business. But there’s no policing entity that’s really going to hold these institutions responsible.”

A cop may have put a pregnant woman in a chokehold during a struggle in Brooklyn »

So the NYPD is at it again. This time they have choked a 7 month pregnant Black woman. Her offense? She was grilling in front of her house. This is over a damn grill.

Right on cue, people are already talking about the NYPD needing sensitivity training etc. They don’t get it. This is what the NYPD does. It’s not about a lack of training. They are looking for any reason to inflict fear and escalate a situation so they can use as much force as possible. I don’t know how many more incidents need to happen to make it click in their heads that the police is terrorizing Black communities. How much more ridiculous do these situations need to get? You tell me what warrants choking a pregnant woman for grilling in front of her house. Damn whether that is not allowed or not. You know what you do in that situation as a cop? You give her a citation or a fine. Not the NYPD, they choke and assault pregnant Black women.

Patrick Obahiagbon’s latest facebook status. If you look past the unnecessary flowery speech, he’s actually making sense this time…lol

Patrick Obahiagbon’s latest facebook status. If you look past the unnecessary flowery speech, he’s actually making sense this time…lol

anotherafrica:

POPCAP’14 WINNER | Joana Choumali

Abidjan based photographer Joana Choumali’s series Hââbré, The Last Generation explores scarification – markings created through superficial incisions made to the body. Hââbré means both writing and scarification in Kô, a Burkinabe language. As documents of the physical traces of shared values, and traditions of self-imaging within cultural groups, her images reflect on how these are subject to change. Once the norm, and having high social value as she describes, individuals bearing these vestiges of the past, are now somewhat “excluded”. Joana Choumali was born in 1974 in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. She lives in Abidjan Cococy, Ivory Coast.

Source | anotherafrica.net

Images courtesy of Joana Choumali and piclet.org. All rights reserved.

ANOTHERAFRICA.NET | TUMBLR | FACEBOOK | TWITTER | INSTAGRAM

badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:

beautiesofafrique:

One in three adults wishes Britain still had an empire

Source

What kind of fuckery is this?

Ahhh, white people who love imperialism, colonialism, forcing the Bible and the English language down everyone’s throats! Banning local cultures, traditions, languages, and religious customs. Banning homosexuality and imposing racist, sexist, patriarchal, homophobic Victorian ideals down brown + black people’s throats! Lovely.

Seriously, the whitewashing of history in school is NO joke. No wonder many people are woefully ignorant.

thefemaletyrant:

Now why would someone go to South Africa with the intent of interviewing a sangoma, and then choose to interview a white “sangoma” talking about our ancestors. I still can’t get over this white “sangoma” thing, I’m glad they at least got a Yoruba man to talk about Yoruba spiritual systems but I can’t stop thinking about that white man talking about sangomas and healing and connecting with the ancestors.

Even the afterlife is not a respite from white encroachment. A white sangoma connecting with the ancestors in the afterlife is just like white people invading Black spaces on earth.

maarnayeri:

2noteselfie:

maarnayeri:

Here go your “both sides”.

You do realize that it has been confirmed that Hamas was the one who struck the school… Lol

Ah, I see, because when we can’t prove things wrong, the next step is to create our own realities, right?
I genuinely implore you not to open that gaping scar across your face you call a mouth to spew ahistorical garbage, even when your most Zionist friendly publications are willing to admit that Israel is indeed the aggressor.
Some articles. I suggest you immerse yourself in them, you know, when you’re through writing up your fanfiction.
http://www.aljazeera.com/news/middleeast/2014/07/israeli-shells-hits-un-shelter-gaza-201472413198190287.html
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/israeli-fire-hits-compound-housing-u-n-school-in-gaza-killing-15/
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/25/world/middleeast/despite-talk-of-a-cease-fire-no-lull-in-gaza-fighting.html?_r=0

“I genuinely implore you not to open that gaping scar across your face you call a mouth”

maarnayeri:

2noteselfie:

maarnayeri:

Here go your “both sides”.

You do realize that it has been confirmed that Hamas was the one who struck the school… Lol

Ah, I see, because when we can’t prove things wrong, the next step is to create our own realities, right?

I genuinely implore you not to open that gaping scar across your face you call a mouth to spew ahistorical garbage, even when your most Zionist friendly publications are willing to admit that Israel is indeed the aggressor.

Some articles. I suggest you immerse yourself in them, you know, when you’re through writing up your fanfiction.

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/middleeast/2014/07/israeli-shells-hits-un-shelter-gaza-201472413198190287.html

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/israeli-fire-hits-compound-housing-u-n-school-in-gaza-killing-15/

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/25/world/middleeast/despite-talk-of-a-cease-fire-no-lull-in-gaza-fighting.html?_r=0

I genuinely implore you not to open that gaping scar across your face you call a mouth”

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes »

emotanreincarnated:

atane:

I’m not giving any major spoilers, but if you haven’t seen the movie yet, it might be best not to read this.

So I recently watched this movie and I was rooting for Koba all the way. I get Koba. I understand why he was angry. We tend to view anger as irrational and bad, but anger can be good. Fury…

I just had this conversation with my sister, i was rooting for Koba too!. We saw first hand what he had to go through in part 1 so he had every right to be angry.

While Caesar was being nurtured and loved by James Franco, Koba was being tortured and experimented on. Caesar did not experience what Koba and the other apes experienced so i get why Koba was so mad at all his decisions.

The movie was a good movie but damn it was so bias. 

Exactly. It sort of reminds me of people who tell the oppressed that not all those in an oppressor class are bad. They think that the ones who did nice things for them completely negates the systemic abuse happening to the masses. Caesar’s life was the exception to the systemic abuse of apes. The rest of his kind didn’t enjoy a life of love, nurture and privilege in a nice home like he did. They were abused, tortured and experimented on in cages like Koba. That was the rule. However, because Caesar is the one ape who was treated well by a human, he is telling apes to trust and help humans, despite the lived experiences of his ape brethren that humans are bad news. The experience Caesar has as the lone ape who had a good relationship with a human supersedes the masses of apes who did not have good relationships with humans.

I feel like Koba’s legitimate grievances and mistrust of humans was brushed aside and presented as irrational, while Caesar’s constant compromising on things that were of no benefit to him and the rest of the apes was presented as fair-minded and noble. In reality, that was what I found to be irrational. The humans were suffering because of the simian flu, but they created the virus in the first place. Maybe they deserve to suffer. This is not the ape’s problem. 

That’s a synopsis of race relations in a nutshell. The bypassing of your suffering and the ill treatment you experienced, so that you can lay on the alter, compromise and if need be, sacrifice yourself and share your space for the greater good because your oppressor doesn’t want to suffer the consequences of something fucked up they did. The space of yours they want access to is a space that you were forced into by them in the first place. The greater good is always what suits and benefits the people who oppressed you. The greater good is never what suits or benefits those on the margins. The oppressor class never puts forward policies that centers the vulnerable and those on the margins. Whenever something is put forward that helps the marginalized, there is always pushback from the oppressor class. In the movie, everything the humans are doing is completely self-serving with zero benefit to apes, but it’s Koba who is vilified for putting his self-interest first.

It’s interesting how this played out in a movie about talking apes. Perhaps the writers wanted it to be a mirror on human society. If so, I certainly noticed.

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

I’m not giving any major spoilers, but if you haven’t seen the movie yet, it might be best not to read this.

So I recently watched this movie and I was rooting for Koba all the way. I get Koba. I understand why he was angry. We tend to view anger as irrational and bad, but anger can be good. Fury can motivate. People think anger is blinding, and it can be, but it can also make you see things clearly. I get why Koba didn’t trust humans. He suffered at the hands of humans. I get his anger. I’d be angry too. Koba represents those that don’t want to make inroads with their oppressors. Caesar represents an always compromising leader, even at the expense of his people. That is a weakness. He’s blind to the dangers of compromising because he thinks compromise is always a solution. Compromise only works if the other party remains true to their word and can be trusted. I also understand why leaders like Caesar think like they do, but I don’t always agree with them. Narratives are always modeled with Caesar’s mindset as being ideal and noble, but it can be mistake. A mentality like Koba’s is always modeled as arrogant, self-serving and foolish, but it doesn’t have to be that way at all. Sometimes it is right. Koba wasn’t wrong.

This isn’t saying that Koba’s character wasn’t troubled, he definitely was and he did very bad things. He is an ape killer and an opportunist. I’m speaking beyond his character flaws, and about this dichotomy that is always presented that compromise with your oppressors is good and rebuking them is bad. I disagree. The way they pushed Caesar’s narrative was that he was an honorable leader, but by god Koba was right. Of what benefit was it to the apes to help the humans generate power? That’s just making humans stronger and a stronger oppressor is bad news. Never strengthen your enemies.

My thing is that if the natural hair movement is for everyone then why is it that black women are the ones who created and sustained it?

slimgoodymakeba:

If it’s just because other non black people sometimes felt bad about their hair why didn’t they start a natural hair movement? If you are being oppressed because of your curly hair why is your expression of that to jump in black spaces and shout “Me too!”? I am confused. Have black women oppressed your white hair? Why are you behaving as if you need to take this from us? Why are you so intent on bleaching, straighting, ironing out, and erasing the Black origins of this movement?

Why are you here? Why are you here in this specifically black space?