Audiophile Life

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Parents can be dream killers

I’m around a lot of young kids. I have 3 nieces and 3 nephews. Many of my friends and other relatives are married with kids. Kids are everywhere in my circles. One thing I’ve noticed is how stifling some parents are. They can be dream killers. It’s like they’re clipping their children’s wings. Whatever limitations they have in their minds becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy and they pass it on to their kids.

Kids are brilliant and you’ll be amazed to see what they can accomplish if you foster their growth and encourage them. Not force, but encourage. They can dream big and if given the opportunity and access, they can often achieve those dreams.

However, time and time again - I see parents telling their children what they can and can’t do. I was at a recital and this little boy said he wants to be an astronaut and his mom said and I quote “That’s dumb. You can barely do anything on earth.” Why would you say that to a little kid?

Being around kids has made me extremely cognizant of my words. Things you say in passing that you’ll forget in an instant can have a lasting effect on them. I like kids because they don’t have pretenses and they are honest. They have little reservations. If you want the truth, ask a child. Their minds are free. It’s usually the adults who put the chains around the necks of children, limiting what they can do, or even worse pushing them to do things they don’t want to do because the parents want to live vicariously through their children. We’ve all seen pageant moms and the dad at the little league games who gets so into it, he’s forgotten that he’s at a game with a bunch of 8 year olds and not the Super Bowl.

Back to believing in children and their abilities, I’ve seen little kids from the South Side of Chicago who are far from privileged play Bach Concerto in D Minor better than kids who were born with silver spoons in the mouths and sent to the finest music schools. They did well despite the odds because people believed in them. They were supported and nurtured. Most importantly, they received positive reinforcement and love.

If you keep telling a kid they won’t amount to anything, don’t be surprised when they do just that. If you have a kid or young relative in your life, have you actually told them that you believe in them? Try it. Many kids aren’t used to hearing that or having people outwardly  support them at all.

portraitsofboston:

    “I grew up in the South Pacific, in Fiji. I came here after high school, and had to get used to a lot of things. I experienced culture shock: a new environment with different people, expectations and assumptions.     It made me want to hang on to the culture of the country where I had spent my formative years. Instead of wanting to assimilate, I decided to stay true to my accent and the things I grew up with. Basically, I was hanging on to the familiar in a world of the unfamiliar.”     “What’s an example of the cultural differences between Fiji and the U.S.?”     “In the culture I grew up in, men wear a sulu, which is similar to a sarong and looks like a skirt. But here? Not so much, unless it’s a kilt. In Fiji, it’s a masculine thing—men wear it all the time and no one bats an eye.  Here, if you wear a sulu or a sarong people will ask you, ‘Why are you wearing a skirt?’ You have to explain that it’s not a skirt, but they’ll still insist that it is. It makes you realize how things are perceived in different environments and societies. In one place, they have assumptions that something is masculine while something else is feminine. When you go somewhere else, it could be completely different, or even the exact opposite. People become confused if you use the same scheme as before—they find it jarring.”

portraitsofboston:

    “I grew up in the South Pacific, in Fiji. I came here after high school, and had to get used to a lot of things. I experienced culture shock: a new environment with different people, expectations and assumptions.
     It made me want to hang on to the culture of the country where I had spent my formative years. Instead of wanting to assimilate, I decided to stay true to my accent and the things I grew up with. Basically, I was hanging on to the familiar in a world of the unfamiliar.”
     “What’s an example of the cultural differences between Fiji and the U.S.?”
     “In the culture I grew up in, men wear a sulu, which is similar to a sarong and looks like a skirt. But here? Not so much, unless it’s a kilt. In Fiji, it’s a masculine thing—men wear it all the time and no one bats an eye.  Here, if you wear a sulu or a sarong people will ask you, ‘Why are you wearing a skirt?’ You have to explain that it’s not a skirt, but they’ll still insist that it is. It makes you realize how things are perceived in different environments and societies. In one place, they have assumptions that something is masculine while something else is feminine. When you go somewhere else, it could be completely different, or even the exact opposite. People become confused if you use the same scheme as before—they find it jarring.”

Short vid of niece again on the piano. I’m a proud uncle.

Here is audio of my 8 year old niece on the piano with other kids at her institute from a radio broadcast yesterday. She comes in at the 9:50 mark for her piece. She’s playing from memorization. No sheet music. So proud. Her development in such a short time is astonishing. 

All these kids are great. They are so smart and are very talented. Where are they? In Chicago. The south side of Chicago. 

portraitsofboston:

     “I was late today. I texted her saying that I would be fifteen minutes late, but then the train stopped at Broadway, so it became fifty. I apologized, but she keeps bringing up me being late. Even when she’s annoyed, she’s incredibly adorable.”

portraitsofboston:

     “I was late today. I texted her saying that I would be fifteen minutes late, but then the train stopped at Broadway, so it became fifty. I apologized, but she keeps bringing up me being late. Even when she’s annoyed, she’s incredibly adorable.”

youngblackandvegan:

northmiamigoon:

More Memes Like This

glory
i’ll be in church caught up
even on the street, thinking about what He brought me through
tears man
straight tears

No. Not glory. This is a picture of Tyrese breaking down because his friend Paul Walker died in an awful fiery car crash. In fact, it is a photo of him at the crash site. He came to bring flowers and say his last goodbyes. It’s definitely not tears of joy for looking back at what god has done for him. He is in pain and is grieving.
Why would someone use this heartbreaking image for this kind of message? We definitely don’t need more memes like this as stated in the OP.
I’ve noticed that the running theme in these “glory memes” is lies and deception. From the fake stories on facebook demanding that you to “like” or type “amen”, to images taken completely out of context and/or altered to push a dogmatic agenda.
Do people not understand that they can be pious and share the joy of their faith without lies and deception? It’s completely unnecessary.

youngblackandvegan:

northmiamigoon:

More Memes Like This

glory

i’ll be in church caught up

even on the street, thinking about what He brought me through

tears man

straight tears

No. Not glory. This is a picture of Tyrese breaking down because his friend Paul Walker died in an awful fiery car crash. In fact, it is a photo of him at the crash site. He came to bring flowers and say his last goodbyes. It’s definitely not tears of joy for looking back at what god has done for him. He is in pain and is grieving.

Why would someone use this heartbreaking image for this kind of message? We definitely don’t need more memes like this as stated in the OP.

I’ve noticed that the running theme in these “glory memes” is lies and deception. From the fake stories on facebook demanding that you to “like” or type “amen”, to images taken completely out of context and/or altered to push a dogmatic agenda.

Do people not understand that they can be pious and share the joy of their faith without lies and deception? It’s completely unnecessary.

maarnayeri:

I’ve been mulling over and ruminating in my thoughts these past couple weeks, desperately attempting to make sense of the senseless. Feverishly trying to patch and weave the pieces of history together to really understand and grapple with the calamities that have bestowed us today.

Reality has begun to satirize itself. By the time we update the list of murdered Palestinians, the list is outdated. Four children are killed on the beach and Hamas is the culprit, despite being nowhere in sight. Israeli leaders can sign off hundreds of missiles into Gaza everyday and go on record to accuse Gazans of self inflicted genocide. 66 years after nakba, Israel has become the most funded and equipped nation in all of Asia per capita, as an individual country receive more aid by America than all of Africa, wage war and occupy illegal territory in most surrounding regions and claim to be in a precarious situation at the hands of those who it has massacred and laid cruel siege to.

DIME bombs unearth entire societies, released on rehabilitation clinics and centers for the disabled and they are labelled human shields who were unfortunate and unintended, but an inevitable sacrifice and collateral damage. White phosphorous is abundantly and indiscriminately used in some of the most densely populated neighborhoods on Earth, while Israeli politicians gain interviews and are globally heralded as crusaders of a noble cause. Palestinian life has proven so cheap to many. More Palestinians have died in this week than Israelis have been injured in the past several years.

Fact has become fiction and fiction becomes fact. 441 miles of apartheid wall that jeopardize agriculture and irrigation is security. Homes inhabited by several generations of families are obliterated in minutes to erect illegal Jewish settlements and is touted as a means of self determination. Billions of dollars continue to be funneled into a genocidal campaign touted around as a settler nation state’s right to self defense against a colonized populace that overwhelmingly relies on foreign aid and has been under heightened blockades with food and drink being counted to the individual calorie. Body count, political leverage and extensive history of settler brutality exemplify one reality. Media exemplifies another.

Israel is the most transparent example of what settler colonial violence is in the age of neoliberalism. How it can deliberately target areas that are unanimously civilian populations and gets off with complete impunity. It distorts truth and history until it becomes eroded from public consciousness altogether. Palestinians are an illegitimate people and their indigenous villages were barren because in Zionist mythology, it was a land without a people for a people without a land. Colonial fabrications dominate public discourse, tangle themselves in media circuits and mock any and every intelligible and dignified approach to account for demolished villages, vibrant humans turned unidentifiable carnage and a military siege on what’s regularly referred to as the largest open air prison on Earth.

The truth is this world failed Palestine. In every conceivable way. Refusing to divest was a failure on every student body member who voted otherwise. Providing arms and military aid was a failure and an obscene act of violence. Using revolutionary language and utilizing one genocide to lay the road for another was a tremendous failure. Invoking racist and Islamophobic rhetoric in a post 9/11 age to justify unjustifiable violence was a failure. Not holding one’s own government accountable for its enabling and apologist stances is a failure. These varied failures allowed this to take place and one day, perhaps not tomorrow or in a year or even in a decade, but the day will indeed arrive where we reminisce on this ongoing bloodshed and realize the ways in which both action and inaction was the catalyst in which this nightmare occurred.

thefemaletyrant:

I’ve had this suspicion that Malala Yousafzai’s visit to Nigeria may be part of a PR campaign by that company our government paid billions to.

Malala visiting Nigeria has been something else, hasn’t it? Articles like How Malala Ignited Search for Missing Chibok Girls are now in print.

These articles all have this tone of blaming #bringbackourgirls activists, as if they are the ones who failed the kidnapped Chibok girls and that Malala has done something that they have not been able to do. It’s really quite shameful.

ourafrica:

I’m so upset, angry and just completely disgusted about this story!


Matthew Durham, 19, allegedly confessed to sexually assaulting several children at an orphanage in Kenya, police said. (Credit: KFOR)

An Edmond teenager faces a possible life in prison sentence after authorities say they learned about shocking crimes he allegedly committed on an African mission trip.

The suspect was volunteering at a Kenyan children’s home when he allegedly raped and molested a number of young children.

According to court records, 19-year-old Matthew Durham confessed to raping several young girls, forcing some boys to perform oral sex on him and even making other kids watch.

“This is a young man in our community that made choices to exploit children in an orphanage,” said United States Attorney Sanford Coats. “It’s a true tragedy all the way around.”

The 19-year-old suspect traveled overseas with a group called Upendo.

Upendo is an organization that assists neglected Kenyan kids by providing food, housing, clothes and religion.

While Durham volunteered to travel overseas several times over the last two years, on his last visit, the criminal complaint alleges, “Durham requested to stay at the children’s home in an ‘overflow bunk’ rather than at an offsite facility.”

During that visit, several alleged victims claimed Durham “often touched them in a sexual manner or told them to touch themselves while he watched.”

Once confronted, Durham allegedly came clean.

“A caretaker at the orphanage noticed something wasn’t right and confronted Mr. Durham. He admitted to some of the acts,” said Coats.

The affidavit continues, “The victims are believed to be both boys and girls between the ages of four and nine, at least one of whom is HIV positive.”

Prosecutors say while the alleged sex crimes were committed overseas, Durham can be held accountable for the crimes in Oklahoma.

Durham is being held without bond.

white nonsense - the top 10 hits »

zemo:

atane:

When you write about race, the feedback and messages white people send you ends up being the same. They all have the same tired retorts. They desperately need to get new material.

Here are the top 10 hits of white nonsense. There are many more examples, but these are the top 10 imo.

1. Not all…

The mentioning of Eastern Europeans here is disrespectful. Considering how many different conquering armies have stomped over the Polish, Ukrainians, etc. over time, there is no need to utilize them as a prop in a “not all…, lol” argument. especially when it’s so clear that the person that would claim Eastern Europeans didn’t participate in imperialism is already doing exactly that.

Everything else I agree with.

I think something is lost in translation here. Let me elaborate.  

I definitely was not using Eastern Europeans as a prop! I mentioned them because it is a very real tactic and ongoing theme people use to derail conversations and topics I write about or bring up. It happens all the time. When I mean all the time, I mean all the time. I could be talking about European colonialism in Africa or the history of white majority rule in Southern African countries, and then someone will message me about Eastern Europeans like I have somehow condemned them. Of course I did no such thing, but they love to play this game and put words in my mouth. It is a diversion.

Sometimes people will bring up Eastern Europeans completely randomly to me. The other day I wrote this post about how when Nigerians die, there is never a concrete number of the casualties. Someone wrote in a reply asking “what about Ukraine people?" Did that have any relevance to what I was talking about? Absolutely not. Just like if I’m talking about the British Empire and their brutal colonialism and white supremacy, someone will message me about Eastern Europe to tell me "not all white people".

This is what I’m talking about. I hope I’ve made myself clear. I’m not disrespecting Eastern Europeans.

Thank you.

Anonymous asked: Hi, I'm trying to learn more about why the term Berber is a slur. I've lived in Morocco for a while and no one has ever asked me to stop using the word / this has never come up so honestly quite confused and want to understand... I live with a family who self-identifies as Berber / Tamazight, as do their friends & relatives, have met professors, shopkeepers, basically people from all walks of life who have never expressed discomfort towards the word. This is the first time I'm hearing of it.

thisisnotafrica:

Hi, I’m a Moroccan Amazigh person here.

I can assure you that there are many Indigenous Moroccans who express their discomfort with the word. It’s actually a word that is derived from the word ‘barbarian’ and is a name that was given to us by our colonizers, which should reflect their attitude and treatment towards us.

Non-indigenous Moroccans often use it because they are ignorant, or because they simply don’t care. ‘Berber’ is what the government know us as, and if you did some research on the Moroccan governments relationship with their indigenous people you would know why they don’t give a shit about what we’re okay with and not okay with.

I don’t mind or have a problem with fellow Amazigh folk using the word Berber, that’s called the power of reclaiming slurs.

Bottom line is, don’t use the word unless you yourself are Amazigh. It’s not difficult, and it’s not too much to ask.

How Ironic

owning-my-truth:

atane:

I saw a news report about South African protests in support for Palestinians in Gaza. It’s beautiful that the world is standing in support for Palestinians, but I find white South African support quite curious. Time after time, white South Africans spoke with indignation in their voices. They were outraged. Here are two choice quotes I heard.

"Israel is occupying and building settlements on Palestinian land."

"Occupation is always wrong."

White South Africans against occupation, colonial settling and theft of land? That is quite rich. How much self-awareness do these people lack about themselves and their people? Should someone tell them about how their existence came to be in South Africa? Maybe they have forgotten. Maybe they really believe in a “rainbow nation”, which is basically the South African equivalent of post-racial.

White leftists have no problem pointing out injustice, as long as the finger is pointing outwards and not at themselves. As I’ve said before, they lack self-reflection. They condemn things that they are guilty of and that they benefit from. So much so that white South Africans can decry occupation and colonial settling as they stand on land they settled on and occupied by pushing the indigenous of the land to the margins, subjecting them to inhumane abuse, daily terror and murder. How incredibly ironic.

White “liberals” are the same the world over. Many of them will wax obtusely about discrimination and oppression and the various charities they donate to, giving each other slaps on the back for how “conscious” and “generous” they are. All of this as they boldly refuse to hold a mirror up to their own oppressive behavior, monopolize space in discourse that is not their own, and deny their privilege and the legacy of their people in their own communities and across the globe. 

It’s disgusting but hardly surprising, but all of this happening in South Africa during protests against other settlers… how fresh, and the irony is not lost on me at all either.

Reblogging for commentary.

white nonsense - the top 10 hits

When you write about race, the feedback and messages white people send you ends up being the same. They all have the same tired retorts. They desperately need to get new material.

Here are the top 10 hits of white nonsense. There are many more examples, but these are the top 10 imo.

1. Not all white people. These people need a disclaimer for life. They need you to say “not all” at all times. Imagine if you went through life saying “not all” for everything. Person 1 “My daughter is afraid of dogs after the neighbor’s dog attacked her.” Person 2 “Not all dogs attack!”

2. What about Chicago? This is the latest diversionary tactic of white people in the US. Suddenly they care about Black lives in Chicago. Just Chicago btw…lol

3. It happened so long ago. White people are still talking about Roman gladiators and ancient Greek battles, but talk about Jim Crow laws (that ended in 1965!), then all of a sudden, you’re talking about shit older than Adam and Eve…lol

4. What about the Irish? What about them? What does anything about the plight of the Irish have to do with Black people? Anytime you talk about the plight of Black people in the US, white people will bring up the Irish. Was it Black people who subjugated the Irish? I do know that Black people in the Americas have surnames like “O’Neal” etc because they had Irish slave masters. Runteldat.

5. It goes both ways. Deep down they don’t even believe this…lol

6. Every group of people did bad things. Alright, show me the group of people who circumnavigated the world bringing destruction, death, disease and an intent to subjugate the indigenous to take their wealth, natural resources and land. As I say this, you just know some fool is fixing to get in my inbox to tell me about how Eastern Europeans didn’t do what Western Europeans did. See point number 1 to understand this mentality.

7. Get over it. This is always said in frustration.

8. I didn’t own slaves. I have yet to come across anyone who has accused a white person of personally owning slaves in 2014, yet they will protest that they didn’t own slaves. They say they didn’t own slaves when no one accused them of it. Black person “I just read this great piece about the case for reparations in the Atlantic by Ta-Nehisi Coates. White person “I didn’t own slaves!”

9. What about reverse racism? This is a tacit admission on their part that racism is real. So much so that they believe racism against them is the reverse. They think racism should be directional and not against them of course. Regular racism against the darkies is fine, but they will take a stand against the reverse stuff. That’s just going too far. Don’t you know they’re white?

10. Quoting this from MLK Jr. “Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.” To white people, this is the only thing MLK Jr. ever uttered in life. That is his entire body of work. Oh, and that he had a dream that black people would hold hands with white people one day. For white people in South Africa, you can substitute MLK Jr. with Nelson Mandela. According to white South Africans, Nelson Mandela’s sole purpose in life was to go around telling everyone to forgive white people. South Africa is a rainbow nation now. Yay!